This is default featured slide 1 title
This is default featured slide 2 title
This is default featured slide 3 title
This is default featured slide 4 title
This is default featured slide 5 title
 

Monthly Archives: June 2017

Kitchen Countertop

The Frontage, the central part of the countertop, is the working area of the kitchen. It is here where we perform mostly the various tasks, such as kneading and chopping. Moreover, it is the surface which absorbs the constant use and abuse of daily meal preparations.

During layout and design, it is important to note that a depth of at least 0.60 meters is required for the countertop’s frontage to function efficiently. This figure ensures, too, that there is a sufficient area to work on while allowing enough space to accommodate the sink, the stove top, and some other small kitchen accessories.

A countertop can either be a continuous space or a connection of two or more slabs joined at angled corners. Often, kitchens with an “L-shaped” or a “U-shaped” layout require seams to accommodate the size of the countertop. Alternatively, you may also consider using gangsaw slabs (slabs which have a depth of more than a meter) to minimize the number of seams.

A Backsplash is a vertical panel installed above the frontage of a countertop. It has three essential functions. First, it serves to protect the wall from splatters and blocks spills and drips from seeping behind the cabinet. It helps keep both surfaces clean and dry, which, in turn, prevents mold from growing inside your kitchen.

Second, it hides the gap between the rear end of the countertop and the wall behind it. Considering that most walls, almost always, are not straight, a void becomes inevitable. The backsplash, therefore, covers this particular problem fittingly.

Lastly, it provides a stunning visual treat to anyone in the kitchen. It adds depth, color, and texture in the room. Whether you prefer a 4″ high or a full-height backsplash, it surely is worth pairing with your countertop.

The countertop’s base is another important factor to consider during the design process. A countertop placed over a wooden cabinet typically requires a Laminated edge profile to hide the substrate supporting the slab. On the other hand, when installed on top of a concrete base or a metal or a stainless steel frame, a Skirting is recommended to conceal the structure underneath.

Planning the location of the sink, the stove top, and, even the wall outlets is a must, as well. Employ the concept of the Work Triangle to ensure you can move freely between each workstation of the kitchen. Once finalized, the installer identifies the position of the Cutouts based on your decision.

He or she may recommend adjusting these locations sometimes, as cutouts make the stone very fragile. There should be at least 50 mm clearance between the nearest edge of the slab and the lip of the cutout. In some cases, the installer may even require to place it with seams.

Hence, it is highly necessary for wooden cabinets and frame bases to have a substrate which supports the stone slab underneath. The underlay prevents cracks and fissures from occurring, especially around the cutouts.

Often an overlooked feature, the Edge Profile is a subtle detail which makes a huge statement. It is a design element which affects the appearance and functionality of the countertop, as well as the whole kitchen itself.

Standard designs range from Eased, Bullnose, Chamfered, etc., but the spectrum of choices are limitless. You can even create your own design. It is a great way of personalizing your kitchen with nothing more than an edging detail.

Copper Sink

Chemical cleaners are a thing of the past when it comes to copper sinks, they do not require harsh cleaning and with care its beauty will last a lifetime. Another positive aspect of copper sinks is that unlike many other types of sinks, these tend to grow in beauty over time. With age, the copper sink will change its color, however, if you do not want the color to change, you can simply use a furniture or brass wax to prevent it. Copper sinks makes things a whole lot easier on your life.

Another great aspect of the copper sink is that it is overall cleaner and more sanitary than other material types. Copper is a natural elemental that contains antibacterial benefits, therefore bacteria and other harmful substances cannot hope to survive on copper. In a study performed on, stainless steel and copper, it was shown that copper is extremely sanitary by comparison. Thanks to the antibacterial benefits of copper, a bacterium that is found on the copper will not live any longer than one to two hours.

When purchasing a copper sink you will want to look for a few specific things. Make sure you consider the décor and look of your home; this will help you understand the type of copper sink you will want. Another thing is to make sure the copper sink is made by hand and not manufactured in a factory somewhere; this will help ensure that you are getting a quality copper sink for your home.

When it comes down to actually purchasing your copper sink, make certain you are purchasing a copper sink of high quality. Yes, price is an important factor for everyone today, however remember the old saying, “You get what you pay for”. This saying holds true with copper sinks as well. The cheaper a copper sink becomes, the less copper it is actually made of. Cheaper copper sinks are typically made of recycled copper, this means that the copper comes from machines or computers that used copper. This further means that the copper used in your copper sink, could only be 90% pure or even less.

Some Benefits Hardwood Flooring

It is very easy these days to install a hardwood floor yourself, even if you are inexperienced, because of the way the pieces are designed. You can save a lot of money on contractors and professional fitters. The wood comes in interlocking pieces. You have to snap these together to create a floating floor. That is all there is to it. It is like putting together a jigsaw puzzle, only on a larger scale.

Before you invest in the hardwood, it is wise to think about other associated costs. You might need to buy some basic equipment to help you install the floor. Remember that a hardwood floor which is not varnished properly or level can lower the value of your house, so be sure you know what you are doing before you begin. If you have any doubts, a professional contractor might be a good idea and will be time saving. A professional contractor will charge several thousand dollars for his work and you might have to wait before the work begins.

Nearly everyone is capable of installing their own hardwood flooring because of how the do-it-yourself installation method has evolved and become far simpler. Many suppliers of hardwood floors know that their customers are not professional flooring fitters so they are usually willing to help or advise you.

It is possible to buy hardwood flooring in a kit that makes your task of fitting it seem even easier still. You can buy ‘pre-finished’ wooden flooring kits if you do not want to varnish the wood yourself. This means that you do not have to seal or finish the floor either before or after installing it. You can get floating floors which snap together like a jigsaw puzzle. If you have never fitting a hardwood floor before but want to give it a go, one of these easy kits is recommended.

Working on Plaster Walls

1. When hanging a picture frame from a hook with a nail in it, first tape a large
piece of masking tape over the area where you will drive the nail. This will help
prevent chip-out. Once the nail is in place, remove the tape.

2. Another way to insert a wall hanger for a picture frame is to drill a small pilot
hole for the nail. The pilot hole need not be deep. Just deep enough to penetrate the
topcoat of plaster. If you see brown dust coming from the drill bit, you are through
the topcoat and into the brown coat.

3. To drive a screw through plaster, always drill a pilot hole!

4. Never use a drywall screw in plaster to hold anything! Even though it may seem
that the plaster is holding it in place, you risk tearing out a large chunk of plaster
should you find a weak spot. Always screw through the plaster and into the studs.

5. When screwing through plaster and into the wall studs, make sure you are into
the wall studs and not the wood lath that holds the plaster on the wall! Pulling down
lath is one of the worst things you can do, as it will pull down large chunks of
plaster with it!

6. Standard stud finders don’t work on plaster walls. You need stud sensors that
feature some sort of deep penetrating technology. Common stud finders are
designed for half-inch drywall walls and can distinguish plaster thickness very well.

7. Use the tapping technique to find studs. Plaster has good harmonics and by
tapping or rapping it with your knuckles, you can usually hear the hollows between
the studs fairly easily.

8. Like anything else in an old house, be extra careful! There weren’t building
codes when many of these houses were built so there is no guarantee that you wall
studs are evenly spaced, that there aren’t old pipes in the walls, or that abandoned
and antiquated plumbing and electrical lines exist in the walls.